i love you, burning man

It’s been ten days since my return from the desert playa that is Black Rock City. Burning Man offers something new and different every year. Personally, this burn was one of restoration and reflection. While many in our camp danced till sunrise at sound camps – most notably Robot Heart – I slept and meditated a lot. Out there, you must listen to your body, and that’s what mine told me to do: relax. My mind’s musings are still settling, and I’m aiming to organize them into something useful soon.

Upon my return to the default world, I found myself yearning for the creativity and spirit that fed my heart, so it was beautiful this morning when, over breakfast, my wife shared a video by Stefan Pildes and his lady love KJ. Over the past few years, they’ve created homage to the place we love with fun music videos featuring fellow burners. Before I headed into the desert this year, I shared their rendition of “Home.” This year, these Groove Hoops members posted a Fertility 2.0 celebration using Michael Franti & Spearhead’s “Say Hey (I Love You).”

Below, is video of the burning of the Temple of Juno, designed by David Best. The burning of The Man was amazing and fun, but as I said, my mind was more meditative, which the temple burn was. I tagged the temple with the name of a friend, Kibibi Dillon, who died this past year. It was good to let go. Now, I’m letting go of the 2012 Burn. Time to dig in heals and get back to tasks at hand.

Thanks to my campmates – Christy, Ron, Jeffrey, Leo, Josiah, Araceli, Marina, Steph, and our honorary German mate, Florian – for sharing it all with me. One love.

PS – If you want to check out my pictures, here is a small album.

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kibibi dillon

The first thing you need to know: her name is pronounced “Key-Bee-Bee.” Not Ki-Bye-Bye. Not Ki-Boo-Bee. It’s, Kibibi. Dillon. But more important than how to correctly pronounce her name is understanding her heart.

I was inspired by this fantastically funny and loving woman. Yesterday, she died. And to me, death means we’re experiencing it. We’re doing it. That thing we all have to do. Follow life into death. It’s inevitable, and yet it’s part of life.

Kibibi followed life. Wherever it took her, she went. Whether creating a salon in her living room, filling the Zipper with joy and dreams, or kicking it at a club with other comics, Kibibi lived her life.

We met about six years ago, and I remember watching one of her first stand up shows. For the past couple years, I had the honor of working with Kibibi and seeing her realize dreams. She’d always been funny. Knew how to MC an event. But she wanted to be a comedian. For real. She wanted to tell the same twenty minutes to people gig after gig. She wanted to clown the crowd. She wanted to hit eight clubs in one night. And she didn’t want to hear you think women aren’t funny.

When she moved back to California earlier this year, I missed saying good bye. That’s why I’m writing. To say thanks for inspiring me to follow where life leads. The night before she died, Kibibi did what she loved doing. She made people laugh. She made people think. She touched lives.

I challenge you to think about how you can touch others’ lives. Today, that is my meditation.

Thanks, Kibibi.